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2017 CAMPER APPLICATION SHORTCUT MENU

CAMP SESSION:  Sunday, July 23 - Saturday, August 5, 2017

APPLY  ||  SUPPLEMENTAL FORMS  ||  2017 BROCHURE

As of Fri, Apr 27, 2017, camp is full and both the girls and boys waiting lists are open!

Return to ADA Camp Carefree home page Learn more about Camper and CIT programs Information for Parents Information for Paid and Volunteer Staff Information for Alumni Adults (18+) Information for Everyone

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FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

 

QUESTIONS

1.  Who is in charge of my camper's medical needs?
2.  Does my camper have to bring his/her own insulin supplies?
3.  If my camper has special dietary needs, do I bring his/her own food?
4.  My camper uses an insulin pump, but doesn't yet know how to change the set.  Will someone help him do this at camp?
5.  How do I handle fears of going to camp prior to Opening Day?
6.  Can I call my camper during camp?
7.  Do many campers get homesick during camp?
8.  Do many of the counselors at camp have diabetes like my camper?
9.  Can my child leave camp early for any special occasion (ie wedding, family vacation, etc)?
10.  If my child misses a year of camp, will we still get information about camp the next year?
11.  What is the process to become a CIT?  Do you have to be a former camper of ADA Camp Carefree to become a CIT?
12.  Can I send packages to my child at camp?

 

ANSWERS

1.  Who is in charge of my camper's medical needs?  The camp medical staff always has at least two doctors and four nurses on duty 24/7.  All of the cabins have either a doctor or a nurse visiting them during testing time.  This medical person is in charge of conferring with each camper in that cabin, about:  their blood sugar at that testing time; how/what they are planning to take for their insulin dose, and also help the camper to figure out the balance between the exercise and amount of insulin taken.  If your camper should get sick, we have a full health center on campus, which can take care of most medical needs.  If necessary, the camper can be taken to the local hospital (Huggins Hospital, in Wolfeboro, NH), which is only about 15 minutes away.  You will be contacted by phone if such a trip is necessary.

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2.  Does my camper have to bring his/her own insulin supplies?  Your camper does not have to bring his/her own insulin supplies.  All supplies are provided for him/her, EXCEPT those who are on a insulin pump.  If your camper is on a insulin pump, he/she must bring his/her own pump supplies to camp, and have them packed into a Rubbermaid-type container, which is labeled with his/her name.

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3.  If my camper has special dietary, do I bring his/her own food?  We have several campers come to camp needing special diets (ie: celiac disease, lactose intolerance, etc.).  Our dietary coordinator makes every effort to make meals that are appropriate for your camper's needs.  Many campers with celiac disease do bring some of their own foods from home. If you decide to do this, we ask that you put it in a bag/container that is labeled carefully, with your camper's name.  We also encourage parents to contact our dietary coordinator to discuss your child's special dietary needs.

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4.  My camper uses an insulin pump, but doesn't yet know how to change the set.  Will someone help him do this at camp?  Yes, all campers with pumps change their sets in the presence of a medical staff person.  This provides medical oversight of and assistance with the set change, as well as an opportunity for the camper to learn how to change the set themselves.

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5.  How do I handle fears of going to camp prior to Opening Day?  Click here for a guideline for parents of "First Time Campers".  Keep in mind, that many of these guidelines are not just for first timers!  Many of our campers get homesick while at camp---even those who have been to camp before!  Two weeks away from home can seem like a long time for some campers.  Please see the guidelines, we're sure that it will help you to prepare your camper for camp!

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The guideline available in this answer is in PDF format and can be viewed with (free) Adobe Acrobat Reader.

 

6.  Can I call my camper during camp?  No.  No phone calls for campers are permitted during camp.  Your camper can't call you and you can't call your camper.  HOWEVER, your MAY send your camper a one-way e-mail message to keep in touch.  Your camper will not be able to respond to the e-mail, but these e-mail messages will be delivered to your, just like the regular mail is delivered every day, during rest hour.

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7.  Do many campers get homesick during camp?  Some of the campers do get homesick.  Many of the counselors are very good in listening to your camper's concerns; and they will work hard to help him/her get through homesickness.  Remember:  it is okay to get homesick, and most people do!  But we want your camper to have fun at camp, and meet as many people like themselves, who have diabetes!  Remember too:  your camper can bring something from home (a stuffed animal, a picture of the family) that will help him/her feel better about missing home.

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8.  Do many of the counselors at camp have diabetes like my camper?  YES!  Our Camp Director, Phyllis, tries very hard to have as many counselors with diabetes at camp!  She wants your camper to have good, positive role models: people that they can feel comfortable talking with about their diabetes, people who can share their experiences with your camper, and people who have lived successful, happy lives while living WITH diabetes!

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9.  Can my child leave camp early for any special occasion (ie wedding, family vacation, etc)?  No, we respectfully ask that you DO NOT plan to have your child leave camp early, for this becomes very problematic not only for your own child, but for those who are still at camp.  A child who leaves early can disrupt the flow of the remaining days of camp as well as disrupt the entire cabin "family". 

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10.  If my child misses a year of camp, will we still get information about camp the next year?  Yes, ADA Camp Carefree has an extensive database system.  As long as we have your current address, you will be sent material for the next year of camp.  If, for some reason, you don't receive that year's information by the month of January, you should contact our Camp Coordinator ASAP! 

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11.  What is the process to become a CIT?  Do you have to be a former camper of ADA Camp Carefree to become a CIT?  No, you don't have to be a former camper to become a CIT at ADA Camp Carefree.  CITs are 16 years old, and are still (legally) considered campers!  They still have to pay a fee to attend camp (which is usually half the full fee), and they also have to apply to become a CIT.  Check out the CIT Information page for more information.

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12.  Can I send packages to my child at camp?  Yes, by all means, you can send packages to your camper!  We respectfully ask that you DO NOT SEND FOOD TO YOUR CAMPER.  The reason for this is two-fold:  in sending food to your camper, this will disrupt the job that the camp dieticians are trying to do with the campers in regards to meal planning.  Also, it is not fair to the other campers in the cabin.  Lastly, it also keeps the little critters out of the cabin---food will attract them into the cabin, if it is there!  If you want to send a care package, you can include things such as:  puzzle books, books, stationary, postcards, card games, small hand games, autograph animals for your child to get signed by all the kids in his/her cabin, and so forth.

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